How to Choose a Framing Nailer for the Job at Hand

Posted by Brett McCutcheon on Nov 23, 2019 9:38:00 AM

Framing Nailers

When it comes to framing a building efficiently, without losing quality, nothing beats a framing nailer. Power nailers are designed for quick production on larger projects. Let’s take a look at how to choose the right framing nailer for your job.

Pneumatic or Cordless?

The difference between a pneumatic and cordless nailer is significant. Pneumatic nailers draw their air from a compressor. Therefore, they put out far more PSI than cordless framing nailers. However, a cordless nailer can still hold their own on projects like decks or siding.

If you’re building a home or a commercial structure, then a pneumatic nailer is critical. They’re far better for repeated use for the user. If you’re just doing a few projects at home now and then, all you really need is a cordless nailer. The only commercial situation where a cordless nailer may be a better option than a pneumatic nailer is in tight spaces that won’t allow a compressor or hose.

Stick-Style vs. Coil-Style Nailer

As with the pneumatic versus cordless nailers, what will determine whether you use a stick-style or coil style nailer will be the size of the job. Coil-style nailers use a round magazine to house at least 50 or more nails. Most stick-style nailers hold less than 50 nails.

Where you will notice the difference is in larger jobs. If you are pounding away at several boards at once and don’t want to stop to reload, then you should opt for a coil nailer. However, if your job requires 40 nails or less, then a stick nailer is your best option.

Size Does Matter

When it comes to nailers, bigger is not always better. What is most important is that the nailer matches the job. This is true for both the nailer and the fasteners. When it comes to tight spaces, the F58 LO PRO nailer, offered by BECK America, will do the trick. The F58 LO PRO nailer packs major power in a smaller, and lighter, profile. It accepts both nails and SCRAIL® fasteners. With both a single and bump fire actuation system, it can help you get the perfect finish in tight spaces. The F58 LO PRO nailer is a solution that can do it all. We also offer JUMBO nailers, like the F91, when your job is too big for your average tool.

The good news is that, regardless of the size, pneumatic nailers are traditionally more lightweight than other equipment on the job. For instance, even a large jumbo nailer commonly used for large-scale construction jobs only weighs 20 pounds with a full cartridge. Therefore, you can still use it and remain agile on the job.

Examine the Features

Look for a gun that has features that make your job easier. A gun that has adjustable depth allows you to control how deep the nails are fired, or one that has a comfortable grip makes it easier to hold at work all day. When it comes to tools used on your construction site, there are many options to choose from. BECK America offers a wide range of nailers that can help you spend less time doing the work and be more comfortable. Watch this real-life demonstration of SCRAIL® fasteners vs. bulk screws vs. collated screws to see the difference the right tool can make. Watch the Video SCRAIL® Time-Trial Competition

Watch the Video: SCRAIL Time Trial Competition

Topics: Pneumatic Nailers, Nailers

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SCRAIL®, Fast like a Nail, Strong like a Screw, are incredibly versatile collated fasteners that can be driven with a pneumatic nailer at a rate twice as fast as collated screws and eight times faster than bulk screws. You can rely upon SCRAIL® fasteners to hold strong, without callbacks to fix a squeak or a nail pop.

Give SCRAIL® a try, and enjoy 10% off your first order.

  • Use SCRAIL® almost anywhere ordinary screws are used
  • Save time and labor costs 
  • Twice as fast as collated screws, eight times faster than bulk screws
  • Easily adjusted, quickly removed
  • Dramatically increased holding power vs. nails
  • Making projects easier since 1998

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